Defending Japan's Pacific war: the Kyoto School Philosophers and post-white power

New York, N.Y.: RoutledgeCurzon (2004)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

This book puts forward a revisionist view of Japanese wartime thinking. It seeks to explore why Japanese intellectuals, historians and philosophers of the time insisted that Japan had to turn its back on the West and attack the United States and the British Empire. Based on a close reading of the texts written by members of the highly influential Kyoto School, and revisiting the dialogue between the Kyoto School and the German philosopher Heidegger, it argues that the work of Kyoto thinkers cannot be dismissed as mere fascist propaganda, and that this work, in which race is a key theme, constitutes a reasoned case for a post-White world. The author also argues that this theme is increasingly relevant at present, as demographic changes are set to transform the political and social landscape of North America and Western Europe over the next fifty years.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,150

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
46 (#346,906)

6 months
1 (#1,475,652)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

Nishida on Heidegger.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):511-553.
An Interpersonal-Epistemic Account of Intellectual Autonomy: Questioning, Responsibility, and Vulnerability.Kunimasa Sato - 2018 - Tetsugaku: International Journal of the Philosophical Association of Japan 2:65-82.
Nishitani on Emptiness and Historical Consciousness.Chen-kuo Lin - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):491-506.
A Confucian Understanding of the Kyoto School's Wartime Philosophy.Thomas Rhydwen - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):69-78.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references