The Notebooks of Simone Weil

Routledge (1956)
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Abstract

Simone Weil (1909-1943) was a defining figure of the twentieth century; a philosopher, Christian, resistance fighter, anarchist, feminist, labor activist and teacher. She was described by T. S. Eliot as "a woman of genius, of a kind of genius akin to that of the saints," and by Albert Camus as "the only great spirit of our time." Originally published posthumously in two volumes, these newly reissued notebooks, are among the very few unedited personal writings of Weil's that still survive today. Containing her thoughts on art, love, science, God and the meaning of life, they give context and meaning to Weil's famous works, revealing a unique philosophy in development and offering a rare private glimpse of her singular personality.

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Citations of this work

Simone Weil: The Ethics of Affliction and the Aesthetics of Attention.Christopher Thomas - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (2):145-167.
Marine Reason.Peter Murphy - 2001 - Thesis Eleven 67 (1):11-37.
Simone Weil’s Phenomenology of the Body.Lissa McCullough - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):195 - 218.

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