Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments

Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49 (2011)
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Abstract

Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.

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Nicole A. Vincent
University of Technology Sydney