The intellectual in Auschwitz: Between vulnerability and resistance

Thesis Eleven 158 (1):24-41 (2020)
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Abstract

The significance of being an intellectual when taken prisoner and sent to a concentration camp by the Nazis is rarely discussed – instead, the importance of being either a Jew or a political prisoner is highlighted. By contrast, Jean Amery’s recollections of being tortured and sent to Auschwitz concentrate on his self-understanding as an intellectual. What difference does the identity and outlook as an intellectual make in the extreme circumstances found in Auschwitz? The paper discusses Amery’s views on this question, invoking that of others who have also addressed it, like Primo Levi and Theodor Adorno.

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References found in this work

The human condition [selections].Hannah Arendt - 2013 - In Timothy C. Campbell & Adam Sitze (eds.), Biopolitics: A Reader. Durham: Duke University Press.
The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World.Elaine Scarry - 1985 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
Can one live after Auschwitz?: a philosophical reader.Theodor W. Adorno - 2003 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press. Edited by Rolf Tiedemann.

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