Oxford University Press USA (2016)

Authors
Shannon Vallor
University of Edinburgh
Abstract
New technologies from artificial intelligence to drones, and biomedical enhancement make the future of the human family increasingly hard to predict and protect. This book explores how the philosophical tradition of virtue ethics can help us to cultivate the moral wisdom we need to live wisely and well with emerging technologies.
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Reprint years 2018
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ISBN(s) 9780190498511   9780190905286   019090528X   019049851X
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Chapters BETA
Virtue Ethics, Technology, and Human Flourishing

Starting with an overview of virtue ethics in the philosophical tradition of the West, beginning with Aristotle, I discuss the contemporary revival of virtue ethics in the West (and its critics). In reviewing virtue ethics’ advantages over other traditional ethical approaches, especially c... see more

Technomoral Wisdom for an Uncertain Future

This chapter integrates the lessons of Part III regarding moral practice, and takes up the challenge of adapting the practice to contemporary technosocial needs—specifically, the need for the global cultivation of technomoral virtues. The bulk of this chapter is a taxonomy of twelve such v... see more

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Citations of this work BETA

Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.Vincent C. Müller - 2020 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Palo Alto, Cal.: CSLI, Stanford University. pp. 1-70.
The Other Question: Can and Should Robots Have Rights?David J. Gunkel - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (2):87-99.
Artificial Intelligence, Values, and Alignment.Iason Gabriel - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (3):411-437.

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