Quasi-realism, negation and the Frege-Geach problem

Philosophical Quarterly 49 (196):337-352 (1999)
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Abstract

Expressivists, such as Blackburn, analyse sentences such as 'S thinks that it ought to be the case that p' as S hoorays that p'. A problem is that the former sentence can be negated in three different ways, but the latter in only two. The distinction between refusing to accept a moral judgement and accepting its negation therefore cannot be accounted for. This is shown to undermine Blackburn's solution to the Frege-Geach problem.

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Nick Unwin
Lancaster University

References found in this work

The moral problem.Michael Smith - 1994 - Cambridge, Mass., USA: Blackwell.
Language, truth and logic.Alfred Jules Ayer - 1936 - London,: V. Gollancz.
The language of morals.Richard Mervyn Hare - 1952 - Oxford,: Clarendon Press.

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