Cultural Challenges to Biotechnology: Native American Genetic Resources and the Concept of Cultural Harm

Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):396-411 (2007)
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Abstract

This article examines the intercultural context of issues related to genetic research on Native peoples. In particular, the article probes the disconnect between Western and indigenous concepts of property, ownership, and privacy, and examines the harms to Native peoples that may arise from unauthorized uses of blood and tissue samples or the information derived from such samples. The article concludes that existing legal and ethical frameworks are inadequate to address Native peoples' rights to their genetic resources and suggests an intercultural framework for accommodation based on theories of intergroup equality and fundamental human rights

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