Ideas galore: Examining the moods of a modern caveman

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):272-273 (2004)

Abstract

A self-experiment by Roberts found that watching faces on early morning television triggered a delayed rhythm in mood. This surprising result is compared with previous research on circadian rhythms in mood. I argue that Roberts' dual oscillator model and theory of Stone-Age living may not provide the explanation. I also discuss the implications of self-experiments for scientific practices.

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