Indiana University Press (2013)

Abstract
In contrast to recent postmodern and deconstructionist readings, Mark A. Tietjen believes that the purpose behind Kierkegaard's writings is the moral and religious improvement of the reader. Tietjen defends Kierkegaard against claims that certain features of his works, such as pseudonymity, indirect communication, irony, and satire are self-deceived or deceitful. Kierkegaard, Communication, and Virtue reveals how they are directly related to the virtues or moral issues being discussed. In fact, Tietjen argues, the manner of presentation is a critical element of the philosophical message being conveyed. Reading broadly in Kierkegaard’s writings, he develops a hermeneutics of trust that fully illustrates Kierkegaard’s aim to evoke faith in his reader
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ISBN(s) 9780253008718   9780253008541   9780253008626   025300862X   0253008549   0253008719
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The Role of Imagination in Kierkegaard’s Account of Ethical Transformation.Ryan S. Kemp - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (2):202-231.

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