Genetic ignorance and reasonable paternalism

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):485-491 (2001)

Abstract

The question concerning an individual''s rightto remain in ignorance regarding her owngenetic makeup is central to debates aboutgenetic information. Whatever is decided onthis matter has a weighty bearing on all of therelated third-party issues, such as whetherfamily members or employers should be toldabout an individual''s genetic makeup. Thosearguing that no right to genetic ignoranceexists tend to argue from a viewpoint I havecalled in this paper reasonablepaternalism. It is an appealing position whichrests on widely shared intuitions on reasonablechoices, but which, in the end, smugglespaternalism back to medical practice.

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References found in this work

A Short History of Medical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
The Right to Genetic Ignorance Confirmed.Tuija Takala - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (3-4):288-293.
Just Ignore It? Parents and Genetic Information.Simo Vehmas - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):473-484.

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