Cambridge University Press (2011)

Authors
Robert Stern
University of Sheffield
Abstract
In many histories of modern ethics, Kant is supposed to have ushered in an anti-realist or constructivist turn by holding that unless we ourselves 'author' or lay down moral norms and values for ourselves, our autonomy as agents will be threatened. In this book, Robert Stern challenges the cogency of this 'argument from autonomy', and claims that Kant never subscribed to it. Rather, it is not value realism but the apparent obligatoriness of morality that really poses a challenge to our autonomy: how can this be accounted for without taking away our freedom? The debate the book focuses on therefore concerns whether this obligatoriness should be located in ourselves, in others or in God. Stern traces the historical dialectic that drove the development of these respective theories, and clearly and sympathetically considers their merits and disadvantages; he concludes by arguing that the choice between them remains open.
Keywords Duty  Responsibility  PHILOSOPHY / History & Surveys / General
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Reprint years 2012, 2014
Buy this book $27.49 new (8% off)   $29.99 from Amazon    $34.67 used   Amazon page
Call number BJ1451.S69 2012
ISBN(s) 9781107434400   9781139211413   9781107012073   1107434408   1107012074
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Citations of this work BETA

Constructivism in Metaethics.Carla Bagnoli - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Constructivism in Metaethics.Carla Bagnoli - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Kant’s Deductions of Morality and Freedom.Owen Ware - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):116-147.
Kant’s Lectures on Ethics and Baumgarten’s Moral Philosophy.Stefano Bacin - 2015 - In Lara Denis & Oliver Sensen (eds.), Kant's Lectures on Ethics: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 15-33.

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