Contextualism and Norton's convergence hypothesis

In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Environmental Ethics. Temple University Press. pp. 135-150 (2009)
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Abstract

Toward Unity among Environmentalists is Bryan Norton’s most developed effort to surmount the frequently intractable debate between anthropocentrists and nonanthropocentrists. Norton argues that the basic axiological differences between the two positions have become irrelevant at the level of policy formation. His thesis is that the two camps converge when dealing with practical goals and aims for environmental management. I argue that Norton’s approach falls significantly short of establishing such a convergence because of the overall methodological framework for policy formation that he defends. The key problem with that framework is that it fails to provide for the degree of species protection most suitable to the nonanthropocentrist position

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Why Norton's Approach is Insufficient for Environmental Ethics.Laura Westra - 2009 - In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Environmental Ethics. Temple University Press. pp. 279-297.
The Relevance of Environmental Ethical Theories for Policy Making.Mikael Stenmark - 2009 - In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Environmental Ethics. Temple University Press. pp. 135-148.

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Bioregionalism and Cross-Cultural Dialogue on a Land Ethic.Richard Evanoff - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2):141 – 156.

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