Authors
Paul Henne
Lake Forest College
Felipe De Brigard
Duke University
Abstract
People maintain a positive identity in at least two ways: They evaluate themselves more favorably than other people, and they judge themselves to be better now than they were in the past. Both strategies rely on autobiographical memories. The authors investigate the role of autobiographical memories of lying and emotional harm in maintaining a positive identity. For memories of lying to or emotionally harming others, participants judge their own actions as less morally wrong and less negative than those in which other people lied to or emotionally harmed them. Furthermore, people judge those actions that happened further in the past to be more morally wrong than those that happened more recently. Finally, for periods of the past when they believed that they were very different people than they are now, participants judge their actions to be more morally wrong and more negative than those actions from periods of their pasts when they believed that they were very similar to who they are now. The authors discuss these findings in relation to theories about the function of autobiographical memory and moral cognition in constructing and perceiving the self over time.
Keywords Autobiographical Memory  Morality  Self  Moral Psychology  Memory
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1037/xge0000317
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The Essential Moral Self.Nina Strohminger & Shaun Nichols - 2014 - Cognition 131 (1):159-171.
Neurodegeneration and Identity.Nina Strohminger & Shaun Nichols - 2015 - Psychological Science 26 (9):1469– 1479.

View all 8 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

On the Ambiguity of ‘the Same Person’.Vilius Dranseika - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (3):184-186.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Autobiographical Remembering: Creating Personal Culture.Craig R. Barclay & Thomas S. Smith - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 75--97.
The Structure of Time in Autobiographical Memory.John Campbell - 1997 - European Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):105-17.
Personal Context in Autobiographical and Narrative Memories.Steen F. Larsen - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 53--74.
Categoric and Extended Autobiographical Memories.J. Mark, G. Williams & Barbara H. Dritschel - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 391--410.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2018-08-30

Total views
725 ( #10,106 of 2,499,665 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
98 ( #7,319 of 2,499,665 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes