Iwant in this chapter to consider the kind of morality we would have reason to believe if it were the case that we inhabit a naturalistic universe. In particular, I want to consider whether in a naturalistic cosmos we would have reason to believe—as very many modern people in fact do—in universal benevolence and human rights as moral facts and imperatives

In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 292 (2009)
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