Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (1):43 – 66 (1999)

Abstract
Kant's concept of autonomy and the Kantian notion of autonomy are often conflated in bioethics. However, the contemporary Kantian notion has very little at all to do with Kant's original. In order to further bioethics discourse on autonomy, I critically distinguish the contemporary Kantian notion from Kant's original concept of moral autonomy. I then evaluate the practical relevance of both concepts of autonomy for use in bioethics. I argue that it is not appropriate to appeal to either concept toward assessing which patients we ought to respect as autonomous. Finally, I sketch criteria for what I take to be a more promising concept of autonomy for patients.
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DOI 10.1076/jmep.24.1.43.2544
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The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
Medical Ethics Needs a New View of Autonomy.R. L. Walker - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):594-608.
The Value of Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Jukka Varelius - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (3):377-388.

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