Abstract
Expertise depends on hours and hours of practice within a field before a state of proficiency is achieved. Normally, expert skills involve bodily knowledge associated to the practices of a field. Interactional expertise, i.e. the ability to talk competently about the field, however, is not causally dependent on bodily proficiency. Instead, interactional experts are verbally skilled to an extent that makes them impossible to distinguish from so-called contributory experts, the experienced practitioners. The concept of interactional expertise defines linguistic skills as contingent on bodily knowledge. However, recent neuropsychological findings make it plausible that “first-person”-related neural activations would be relevant with respect to the subjects' verbal output, at least when subjects address concepts that refer to tangible objects. Using imitation games, we explore and expand on the apparently arbitrary relation between bodily experiences and linguistic skills in midwifery. In alignment with several findings within grounded cognition studies, the results presented suggest that somehow personal experiences make a linguistic difference, noticeable to contributory experts.
Keywords Embodied cognition  Grounded cognition  Expertise  Linguistic skills  Midwifery
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DOI 10.1007/s11097-009-9147-1
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References found in this work BETA

Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff & Mark Johnson - 1980 - University of Chicago Press.
Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff & Mark Johnson - 1980 - Ethics 93 (3):619-621.
Rethinking Expertise.H. M. Collins & Robert Evans - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
Interactional Expertise as a Third Kind of Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.

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Citations of this work BETA

Clarifying Interactional and Contributory Expertise.Mads Goddiksen - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:111-117.
Derived Embodiment and Imaginative Capacities in Interactional Expertise.Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):309-325.
On Derived Embodiment: A Response to Collins. [REVIEW]Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):423-425.

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