Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (7-8):7-8 (2011)

Abstract
How flexible is language? To what extent does language 'absorb' individual differences, for example physical interaction, in knowledge acquisition within a domain? Current neuropsychological findings show that conceptual knowledge is embodied. When reading the word 'cinnamon', supportive neural activity includes brain areas usually engaged in perceptual tasks. Such findings suggest that perceptual and somatosensory processes influence the conceptual knowledge of the competent language user. Here, I explore what I name the 'plasticity' of language, to hone in on characteristics of language, which, once language is in place, might lessen the necessity of physical interaction with the environment during knowledge acquisition. Linguistic knowledge is acquired by way of structures that contain representations of previous physical interactions. This could explain how a person's experiences transcend the boundary of the individual and meaningfully translate into linguistic knowledge accessible to others, as seems to be the case in so-called interactional expertise; expertise acquired without physical interaction
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 71,199
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Why Animals Are Not Robots.Theresa S. S. Schilhab - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):599-611.
Derived Embodiment and Imaginative Capacities in Interactional Expertise.Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):309-325.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

On Interactional Expertise: Pragmatic and Ontological Considerations.Evan Selinger & John Mix - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):145-163.
The Trouble with Madeleine.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):165-170.
Interactional Expertise as a Third Kind of Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.
Derived Embodiment and Imaginative Capacities in Interactional Expertise.Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):309-325.
Tacit Knowledge: New Theories and Practices. [REVIEW]Evan Selinger - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):247-249.
The Nature and Nurture of Expertise: A Fourth Dimension. [REVIEW]Gregory J. Feist - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):275-288.
Interactional Expertise and Embodiment. Selinger, Evan, Dreyfus, Hubert & Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 38 (4):722-740.
Experiments with Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Rob Evans, Rodrigo Ribeiro & Martin Hall - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):656-674.
The Experience of the Tacit in Multi- and Interdisciplinary Collaboration.David A. Stone - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):289-308.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-10-27

Total views
14 ( #734,864 of 2,518,085 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
2 ( #272,378 of 2,518,085 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes