Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):375 - 390 (2001)

Abstract
This paper explores the relationship between organizational size, structure and the strength of organization members'' ethical predispositions. It is hypothesized that individuals in smaller, more flexible, organic organizations will display stronger ethical predispositions. Survey results from 209 individuals across eleven organizations indicate that contrary to expectations, larger, more rigid, mechanistic structures were associated with higher levels of ethical formalism and utilitarianism. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Keywords centralization  ethics  formalism  formalization  mechanistic  organic  size  structure  utilitarianism
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Reprint years 2004
DOI 10.1023/A:1010793308837
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References found in this work BETA

Utilitarianism.J. S. Mill - 1861 - Oxford University Press UK.
Two Concepts of Rules.John Rawls - 1955 - Philosophical Review 64 (1):3-32.

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