The spatial reorientation data do not support the thesis that language is the medium of cross-modular thought

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):697-698 (2002)
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Abstract

A central claim of the target article is that language is the medium of domain-general, cross-modular thought; and according to Carruthers, the main, direct evidence for this thesis comes from a series of fascinating studies on spatial reorientation. I argue that the these studies, in fact, provide us with no reason whatsoever to accept this cognitive conception of language.

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Richard Samuels
Ohio State University

Citations of this work

Conceptual Structure and the Emergence of the Language Faculty: Much Ado about Knotting.David J. Lobina - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):519-539.

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