Anthropomorphism in AI

Abstract

AI research is growing rapidly raising various ethical issues related to safety, risks, and other effects widely discussed in the literature. We believe that in order to adequately address those issues and engage in a productive normative discussion it is necessary to examine key concepts and categories. One such category is anthropomorphism. It is a well-known fact that AI’s functionalities and innovations are often anthropomorphized. The general public’s anthropomorphic attitudes and some of their ethical consequences have been widely discussed in the literature. However, how anthropomorphism permeates AI research itself, and what the epistemological and ethical consequences of this might be have received less attention. In this paper we explore this issue. We first set the methodological/theoretical stage, making a distinction between a normative and a conceptual approach to the issues. Next, after a brief analysis of anthropomorphism and its manifestations in the public, we explore its presence within AI research with a particular focus on brain-inspired AI. Finally, on the basis of our analysis, we identify some potential epistemological and ethical consequences of the use of anthropomorphic language and discourse within the AI research community, thus reinforcing the need of complementing the practical with a conceptual analysis.

Download options

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 72,766

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2020-04-01

Downloads
12 (#816,427)

6 months
1 (#386,989)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author Profiles

Similar books and articles

The Need for a Conceptual Expansion of Neuroethics.Arleen Salles, Kathinka Evers & Michele Farisco - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):126-128.
Neuroethics: A Conceptual Approach.Michele Farisco, Arleen Salles & Kathinka Evers - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):717-727.
Big Science, Brain Simulation, and Neuroethics.Michele Farisco, Kathinka Evers & Arleen Salles - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (1):28-30.
Critical Anthropomorphism and Animal Ethics.Fredrik Karlsson - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):707-720.
Conditioned Anti-Anthropomorphism.Colin Allen & Grant Goodrich - 2007 - Comparative Cognition and Behavior Reviews 2:147-150.
Anthropomorphism as Cognitive Bias.Mike Dacey - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1152-1164.
Sweeping Anthropomorphism Under the MAT.P. De Jesus - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (2):216-218.
Amorphism, Mechanomorphism, and Anthropomorphism.Emanuela Cenami Spada - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press.
Anecdote, Anthropomorphism, and Animal Behavior.Bernard E. Rollin - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 125--33.
Anthropomorphism and the Study of Animal Language.J. Kiriazis & C. Slobodchikoff - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 365--369.
Anthropomorphism: A Definition and a Theory.Stewart E. Guthrie - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 50--58.
Anthropomorphism, Common Sense, and Animal Awareness.H. A. Herzog & S. Galvin - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 237--53.