Empiricist word learning

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1117-1117 (2001)
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Abstract

At first, Bloom's theory appears inimical to empiricism, since he credits very young children with highly sophisticated cognitive resources (e.g., a theory of mind and a belief that real kinds have essences), and he also attacks the empiricist's favoured learning theory, namely, associationism. We suggest that, on the contrary, the empiricist can embrace much of what Bloom says.

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Dan Ryder
University of British Columbia

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