Authors
Gustavo E. Romero
Universidad Nacional de La Plata
Abstract
Black holes are arguably the most extraordinary physical objects we know in the universe. Despite our thorough knowledge of black hole dynamics and our ability to solve Einstein’s equations in situations of ever increasing complexity, the deeper implications of the very existence of black holes for our understanding of space, time, causality, information, and many other things remain poorly understood. In this paper I survey some of these problems. If something is going to be clear from my presentation, I hope it will be that around black holes science and metaphysics become more interwoven than anywhere else in the universe.
Keywords Causality  Spacetime  Time arrows  Thermodynamics  Ontology  Scientific philosophy
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The Universe as We Find It.John Heil - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
Quantum Gravity.Carlo Rovelli - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
Philosophy of Physics: Space and Time.Tim Maudlin - 2012 - Princeton University Press.

View all 49 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Limits of Information.D. J. - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (4):511-524.
The Case for Black Hole Thermodynamics Part I: Phenomenological Thermodynamics.David Wallace - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 64:52-67.
Space, Time, and Irreversibility.Gustavo E. Romero - 2017 - MÈTODE Science Studies Journal 7:201-209.
Lost horizon? – modeling black holes in string theory.Nick Huggett & Keizo Matsubara - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (3):1-19.
Black Hole Thermodynamics and Lorentz Symmetry.Ted Jacobson & Aron C. Wall - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1076-1080.
The Case for Black Hole Thermodynamics, Part II: Statistical Mechanics.David Wallace - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 66:103-117.
The Collapse of Supertasks.Gustavo E. Romero - 2014 - Foundations of Science 19 (2):209-216.
Horizon Entropy.Ted Jacobson & Renaud Parentani - 2003 - Foundations of Physics 33 (2):323-348.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2021-10-21

Total views
91 ( #126,519 of 2,498,160 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
44 ( #19,284 of 2,498,160 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes