Nietzsche on Loneliness, Self-Transformation, and the Eternal Recurrence

Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):194-213 (2018)
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Abstract

Nietzsche’s presentation of the eternal recurrence in Gay Science 341 is often viewed as a practical thought experiment meant to radically transform us. But exactly why and how we are supposed to be transformed is not clear. I contend that addressing these issues requires taking a close look at the psychological setting of the passage. The eternal recurrence is presented in our “loneliest loneliness.” I argue that facing the eternal recurrence from a state of profound loneliness both motivates self-transformation and contributes toward helping us succeed at that project.

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Justin Remhof
Old Dominion University

Citations of this work

Loneliness, Love, and the Limits of Language.Ruth Rebecca Tietjen & Rick Anthony Furtak - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):435-459.

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References found in this work

Introduction.David Lay Williams - 2021 - European Journal of Political Theory 20 (3):568-574.
Eternal Recurrence.Paul S. Loeb - 2013 - In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. New York: Oxford University Press.
Introduction.Nancy Williams - 2003 - Essays in Philosophy 4 (1):1-2.

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