The Owl of Minerva 32 (1):5-19 (2000)

Authors
Jeffrey Reid
University of Ottawa
Abstract
The creation of the University of Berlin in 1810 was the result of interaction between the state and philosophy, two human expressions whose relationship, at least since Socrates' death and Aristotle's exile, has tended to be problematical. That university, which became an important model for North American institutions of higher learning, was from the outset a state university; it was designed and run by the state, as opposed to what was previously the rule: institutions dependent on the Church or princes. The bind, of course, is that this idea of a modern university, defined by its independence with regard to ecclesiastical and private interests, must henceforth depend on the state to guarantee its independence. This dilemma is already apparent in the philosophical ideas at work in the University of Berlin's early evolution.
Keywords Major Philosophers
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s) 0030-7580
DOI 10.5840/owl200032115
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 71,316
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Response to Halper and Dahlstrom.Alison Stone - 2005 - Hegel Bulletin 26 (1-2):22-27.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-11-23

Total views
33 ( #347,893 of 2,519,272 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
3 ( #205,898 of 2,519,272 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes