Ethics and International Affairs 33 (3):279-289 (2019)

Abstract
As part of the roundtable “Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences,” this essay discusses whether economic sanctions are morally acceptable policy tools. It notes that both conventional and targeted sanctions not only often fail to achieve their stated objectives but also bring about significant negative externalities in target countries. Economic dislocation and increases in political instability instigated by sanctions disproportionately affect the well-being of opposition groups and marginalized segments of society, while target elites and their support base remain insulated from the intended costs of foreign pressure. Sanctions might also incentivize target governments to use repressive means to consolidate their rule and weaken the opposition. Given these serious shortcomings, I argue that sanctions are ethically problematic tools of foreign policy. Nonetheless, this does not mean that sanctions should be rejected outright, as there might be cases where sanctions are the only viable option, and they might work effectively under certain circumstances. Rather, the essay suggests that policymakers should apply more caution in considering the use of sanctions given their low probability of success, and should be more concerned with the delicate balance between political gain and civilian pain before levying sanctions, whether comprehensive or targeted.
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DOI 10.1017/s0892679419000327
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References found in this work BETA

Smart Sanctions Revisited.Joy Gordon - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):315-335.
A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions.Joy Gordon - 1999 - Ethics and International Affairs 13:123–142.
Just War Principles and Economic Sanctions.Albert C. Pierce - 1996 - Ethics and International Affairs 10:99–113.

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