Pandemic Ventilator Rationing and Appeals Processes

Health Care Analysis 19 (2):165-179 (2011)
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Abstract

In a severe influenza pandemic, hospitals will likely experience serious and widespread shortages of patient pulmonary ventilators and of staff qualified to operate them. Deciding who will receive access to mechanical ventilation will often determine who lives and who dies. This prospect raises an important question whether pandemic preparedness plans should include some process by which individuals affected by ventilator rationing would have the opportunity to appeal adverse decisions. However, the issue of appeals processes to ventilator rationing decisions has been largely neglected in state pandemic planning efforts. If we are to devise just and effective plans for coping with a severe influenza pandemic, more attention to the issue of appeals processes for pandemic ventilator rationing decisions is needed. Arguments for and against appeals processes are considered, and some suggestions are offered to help efforts at devising more rational pandemic preparedness plans

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Author Profiles

Daniel Patrone
State University of New York, Oneonta

References found in this work

Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly.Norman Daniels - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics.Onora O'Neill - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
The birth of bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1998 - New York: Oxford University Press.

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