Kleon's eyebrows (Cratin. fr. 228 K-A) and late 5th-century comic portrait-masks

Classical Quarterly 49 (1):320-321 (1999)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

At Aristophanes, Equites 230–2, one of the slaves who speak the prologue informs the audience that, when the Paphlagonian appears onstage, his mask will not resemble him, for the σκεoπoιoí were afraid to make one that depicted him accurately. In an important article, K. J. Dover argued that it must in fact have been very difficult to create easily recognizable portrait-masks, and suggested that the joke in Eq. 230–2 may be that the Paphlagonian's mask is horribly ugly but allegedly still nowhere near ugly enough. In response, D. Welsh, following an anonymous ancient commentator on Lucian, argued that Cratinus fr. 228 K-A shows that the historical Kleon had strikingly unattractive eyebrows. Had anyone wished to caricature the demagogue's physical appearance, therefore, he coule easily have done so, and portrait-masks may not have been so uncommon after all. Welsh's argument is at first glance quite appealing, and has been endorsed without further comment or argument by Sommerstein and Storey. I suggest, however, that the ancient commentator was confused, and that Cratinus’ remark is much more easily explained by reference to what is known about the use of facial expression as a communicative strategy in classical and early Hellenistic Athens, particularly as it appears in the comic poets. Kleon's eyebrows were probably no more ugly than those of anyone else, although he may have used them in an offensive way, and as Dover saw long ago, Eq. 230–2 cannot be taken as evidence for the use of portrait-masks on the late 5th-century comic stage.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 74,509

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Knights 230–3 And Cleon's Eyebrows.D. Welsh - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):214-.
Knights 230–3 And Cleon's Eyebrows.D. Welsh - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (1):214-215.
Notes on Aristophanes' Knights.A. H. Sommerstein - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (01):46-.
Opposing Powers.Randolph Clarke - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 149 (2):153 - 160.
World of Masks.Stephen David Ross - 2009 - International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:143-196.
Two Titles of Goddesses in Hesychios.H. J. Rose - 1932 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):58-.
Superficial Dispositionalism.Lauren Ashwell - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):635-653.
Masks on the Roman Stage.W. Beare - 1939 - Classical Quarterly 33 (3-4):139-.
Masks on the Roman Stage.W. Beare - 1939 - Classical Quarterly 33 (3-4):139-146.
Las Máscaras Del Sí Mismo.Jacinto Choza - 1993 - Anuario Filosófico 26 (2):375-394.
Ethics and Comic Amusement.Noël Carroll - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
The Number of Speaking Actors in Old Comedy.Douglas M. MacDowell - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):325-.
The Number of Speaking Actors in Old Comedy.Douglas M. MacDowell - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (2):325-335.

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-12-09

Downloads
32 (#362,161)

6 months
1 (#418,511)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

Satyr and Image in Aeschylus' Theoroi.Patrick O'Sullivan - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (02):353-.
Satyr and Image in Aeschylus' Theoroi.Patrick O'Sullivan - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (2):353-366.

Add more citations

References found in this work

Knights 230–3 And Cleon's Eyebrows.D. Welsh - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):214-.
Cleon Caricatured on a Corinthian Cup.E. L. Brown - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:166-170.
Names and Naming in Aristophanic Comedy.S. Douglas Olson - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (02):304-.

Add more references