Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits

University of Nebraska Press (1974)
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Abstract

This English translation—the first since 1909—restores Human, All Too Human to its proper central position in the Nietzsche canon. First published in 1878, the book marks the philosophical coming of age of Friedrich Nietzsche. In it he rejects the romanticism of his early work, influenced by Wagner and Schopenhauer, and looks to enlightened reason and science. The "Free Spirit" enters, untrammeled by all accepted conventions, a precursor of Zarathustra. The result is 638 stunning aphorisms about everything under and above the sun.

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Citations of this work

Nietzsche's Positivism.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.
Inner Opacity. Nietzsche on Introspection and Agency.Mattia Riccardi - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):221-243.
Virtue in Virtue Ethics.Joel J. Kupperman - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (2-3):243-255.
Bernard Williams.Timothy Chappell & Nick Smyth - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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