Why we need better ethics for emerging technologies

Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):111-119 (2005)
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Abstract

Technological revolutions are dissected into three stages: the introduction stage, the permeation stage, and the power stage. The information revolution is a primary example of this tripartite model. A hypothesis about ethics is proposed, namely, ethical problems increase as technological revolutions progress toward and into the power stage. Genetic technology, nanotechnology, and neurotechnology are good candidates for impending technological revolutions. Two reasons favoring their candidacy as revolutionary are their high degree of malleability and their convergence. Assuming the emerging technologies develop into mutually enabling revolutionary technologies, we will need better ethical responses to cope with them. Some suggestions are offered about how our approach to ethics might be improved.

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James H. Moor
Dartmouth College

References found in this work

What is computer ethics?James H. Moor - 1985 - Metaphilosophy 16 (4):266-275.
The future of computer ethics: You ain't seen nothin' yet! [REVIEW]James H. Moor - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.

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