The Vegetative Soul: From Philosophy of Nature to Subjectivity in the Feminine

State University of New York Press (2002)
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Abstract

Rethinks the soul in plant-like terms rather than animal, drawing from nineteenth-century philosophy of nature

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Author Profiles

Eleanor Miller
Durham University
Elaine P. Miller
Miami University, Ohio

Citations of this work

Nature Trouble: Ancient Physis and Queer Performativity.Emanuela Bianchi - 2019 - In Emanuela Bianchi, Sara Brill & Brooke Holmes (eds.), Antiquities Beyond Humanism. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. pp. 211-238.
Intuition and Nature in Kant and Goethe.Jennifer Mensch - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):431-453.
Continental feminism.Jennifer Hansen - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Vegetal anti-metaphysics: Learning from plants.Michael Marder - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):469-489.
Proper activity, preference, and the meaning of life.Lucas J. Mix - 2014 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 6 (20150505).

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References found in this work

The Epistemology of Metaphor.Paul de Man - 1978 - Critical Inquiry 5 (1):13-30.
Phenomenality and Materiality in Kant.Paul De Man - 1984 - In Gary Shapiro & Alan Sica (eds.), Hermeneutics: questions and prospects. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

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