No God, No Caesar, No Tribune!...: Cornelius Castoriadis Interviewed by Daniel Mermet

Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):1-12 (2010)
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Abstract

In this interview, Cornelius Castoriadis explains and develops many of the central themes in his later writings on politics and social criticism. In particular, he poignantly articulates his critique of contemporary pseudo-democracy, while advocating a form of democracy founded on collective education and self-government. He also explores how the “insignificance” in the current political arena relates to insignificance in other areas, such as the arts and philosophy, to form the core feature of our Zeitgeist. Finally, he seeks to break through the ideological fog of liberalism and privatization in order to voice a radical appeal for an autonomous, self-limiting society.

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Gabriel Rockhill
Villanova University

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