Cosmos and History 10 (2):138-157 (2014)

Authors
Todd Mei
University of California, Berkeley
Abstract
It is often assumed that science provides the most accurate knowledge about nature. This view not only collapses distinctions between different forms of knowing but also results in a paradox whereby understanding what it means to exist in the world is dictated by practioners of science. In this essay I argue for the relevance of an existential conception of nature via the philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and how his notions of thrownness and phusis enable us to recognize a certain ethical bond to nature. I conclude with a critical analysis of liability insurance and actuarial science to demonstrate my points
Keywords insurance  existentialism  thrownness  Collingwood  phusis  Nature  Heidegger
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In Defence of Ontic Structural Realism.Steven French & James Ladyman - 2011 - In Alisa Bokulich & Peter Bokulich (eds.), Scientific Structuralism. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 25-42.
The Task of Hermeneutics.Paul Ricoeur - 1973 - Philosophy Today 17 (2):112.
Illness, Phenomenology, and Philosophical Method.Havi Hannah Carel - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):345-357.
The Function of Fiction in Shaping Reality.Paul Ricoeur - 1979 - Man and World 12 (2):123-141.

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