Robot Lies in Health Care: When Is Deception Morally Permissible?

Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (2):169-162 (2015)

Abstract

From the very beginnings of Artificial Intelligence, the users’ misjudgment of a machine’s capabilities has been one of the recurrent topoi. Weizenbaum reports the surprising reaction of users to the crude conversational capabilities of the now-famous “Eliza” program :I was startled to see how quickly and how deeply people conversing with “Doctor” became emotionally involved with the computer and how unequivocally they anthropomorphized it. Once my secretary, who had watched me work on the program for many months and therefore surely knew it to be merely a computer program, started conversing with it. After only a few interchanges with it, she asked me to leave the room. [There is]..

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