Costs and benefits of female aggressiveness in humans and other mammals

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):231-232 (1999)
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Abstract

Sex differences in aggressive behavior are probably adaptive but the costs and benefits of risky aggression to women and men may be different from those suggested in Campbell's target article. Moreover, sex differences are more likely to reflect differences in the costs of aggression to females and males rather than differences in its benefits.

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