Defining Miracles: Direct vs. Indirect Causation

Philosophy Compass 11 (5):267-276 (2016)
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Abstract

In this paper, a candidate necessary condition of a miracle is introduced: the direct restriction. The direct restriction holds that all miraculous effects have direct non-natural causes.

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Morgan Luck
Charles Sturt University

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References found in this work

The Non-Existence of God.Nicholas Everitt - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):692-693.
Miracles.Richard Swinburne (ed.) - 1989 - Macmillan.
Miracles.R. G. Swinburne - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):320-328.

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