An investigation of student moral awareness and associated factors in two cohorts of an undergraduate business degree in a british university: Implications for business ethics curriculum design [Book Review]

Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):7-19 (2003)

Abstract

Debate exists as to the timing of student exposure to business ethics modules, and the degree to which business ethics education is integrated throughout business school curricula. The argument for an integrated model of business ethics education is well documented, however, such arguments do not stem from an empirical basis. Much of the debate about when and how business ethics should be taught rests on assumptions regarding the stage of moral awareness of business students. The research reported here adds to this debate by attempting to empirically gauge students'' levels of moral awareness in order to explore the implications for the teaching of business ethics, specifically in terms of presenting the case for the importance of an integrated business ethics curriculum.

Download options

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 72,766

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
98 (#122,447)

6 months
1 (#386,499)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Similar books and articles

Integrating Business Ethics Into an Undergraduate Curriculum.Terrence R. Bishop - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):291 - 299.
Business Ethics: A Classroom Priority? [REVIEW]Allayne B. Pizzolatto & Sandra Bevill - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):153 - 158.
From the Business Ethics Course to the Sustainable Curriculum.Derek Owens - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (15):1765 - 1777.