Nanoethics and Human Enhancement: A Critical Evaluation of Recent Arguments

Nanotechnology Perceptions 2:47-52 (2006)
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Abstract

Human enhancement – our ability to use technology to enhance our bodies and minds, as opposed to its application for therapeutic purposes – is a critical issue facing nanotechnology. It will be involved in some of the near-term applications of nanotechnology, with such research labs as MIT’s Institute for Soldier Technologies working on exoskeletons and other innovations that increase human strength and capabilities. It is also a core issue related to far-term predictions in nanotechnology, such as longevity, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence and other issues

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Patrick Lin
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

References found in this work

Can Enhancement Be Distinguished from Prevention in Genetic Medicine?Eric T. Juengst - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):125-142.

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