Isis 93 (2):206-228 (2002)

Abstract
A distinct British approach to disease in the tropics has been identified in the recent historiography of colonial medicine: Mansonian tropical medicine, named after Sir Patrick Manson , the founder of the London School of Tropical Medicine. This essay examines Manson's study of filariasis and argues that his conceptual tools and research framework were derived from contemporary natural history. It investigates Manson's training in natural history at the University of Aberdeen, where some of his teachers were closely associated with transcendental biology. The concepts of perfect adaptation and the harmony of nature were crucial to the formulation of his research problematic. This essay demonstrates that biogeographical concepts played an important part in Manson's research methodology. It also investigates how Manson's natural historical approach contributed to the making of so‐called Mansonian tropical medicine
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DOI 10.1086/344961
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Natural History and the Clinic: The Regional Ecology of Allergy in America.G. Mitman - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (3):491-510.
Natural History and the Clinic: The Regional Ecology of Allergy in America.Gregg Mitman - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (3):491-510.

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