Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (4):1-16 (2021)

Abstract
Despite the benefits biobanks are expected to bring, there have recently been concerns raised that the public and private non-profit biobanks still prevailing in Europe often fail to reach their initial objectives due to a variety of reasons, including a shortage of funding and insufficient utilization of collections. The necessity to find new ways to manage biobanks has been clearly recognized and one way to do this is to follow the success of some commercial direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies in the biobanking field. This paper is focused on a double role the return of individual health related findings detected through the biobanking activities can play in the management of biobanks. These findings can be seen as an untapped opportunity to offer health related information to biobank participants. At the same time, the IHRF policy can also serve as an additional tool that can improve biobanking governance. This paper aims to consider diverse IHRF approaches as well as to explore some key ethical concerns related to them. In particular, it reveals how different accounts of personal autonomy shape consent policies related to IHRF and emphasizes ethical controversies related to the commercial DTC GT initiatives as well as some non-profit biobanks.
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DOI 10.1007/s11948-021-00330-9
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Biobanks and Feedback.Kadri Simm - 2014 - In Ruth Chadwick, Mairi Levitt & Darren Shickle (eds.), The Right to Know and the Right not to Know. Cambridge University Press. pp. 55-70.

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