Brain Machine Interface and Human Enhancement – An Ethical Review

Neuroethics 6 (3):617-625 (2013)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Brain machine interface (BMI) technology makes direct communication between the brain and a machine possible by means of electrodes. This paper reviews the existing and emerging technologies in this field and offers a systematic inquiry into the relevant ethical problems that are likely to emerge in the following decades

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,923

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Re-inventing ourselves: The plasticity of embodiment, sensing, and mind.Andy Clark - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (3):263 – 282.
Bioethics and Japanese Culture: Brain Death, Patients' Rights, and Cultural Factors.Masahiro Morioka - 1995 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 5 (4):87-90.

Analytics

Added to PP
2013-03-10

Downloads
172 (#115,953)

6 months
27 (#113,900)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Karim Jebari
Institute for Futures Studies

References found in this work

Human Enhancement.Nick Bostrom & Julian Savulescu (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
The right to privacy.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1975 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (4):295-314.
Stimulating brains, altering minds.W. Glannon - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):289-292.

View all 11 references / Add more references