Risk-Taking: Individual and Family Interests

Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):437-450 (2015)
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Abstract

Decisions regarding clinical procedures or research participation typically require the informed consent of individuals. When individuals are unable to give consent, the informed permission of a legally authorized representative or surrogate is required. Although many proposed procedures are aimed primarily at benefiting the individual, some are not. I argue that, particularly when individuals are asked to assume risks primarily or exclusively for the benefit of others, family members ought to be engaged in the informed consent process. Examples of procedures in which individuals are asked to assume risks primarily or exclusively for the benefit of others include living organ donation and research participation

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Ana S. Iltis
Wake Forest University

Citations of this work

Adolescents Lack Sufficient Maturity to Consent to Medical Research.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):307-317.
Informed Consent: The Decisional Standing of Families.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):363-370.
Truth, Progress, and Regress in Bioethics.Victor Saenz - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (6):615-633.

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References found in this work

What about the Family?John Hardwig - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (2):5.
What About the Family?John Hardwig - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (2):5-10.
Doctor-family-patient relationship: The chinese paradigm of informed consent.Yali Cong - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):149 – 178.
Taking Families Seriously.James Lindemann Nelson - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (4):6-12.

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