Genetic information, rights, and autonomy

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):403-414 (2001)

Abstract

Rights, autonomy, privacy, and confidentialityare concepts commonly used in discussionsconcerning genetic information. When theseconcepts are thought of as denoting absolutenorms and values which cannot be overriden byother considerations, conflicts among themnaturally occur.In this paper, these and related notions areexamined in terms of the duties and obligationsmedical professionals and their clients canhave regarding genetic knowledge. It issuggested that while the prevailing idea ofautonomy is unhelpful in the analysis of theseduties, and the ensuing rights, an alternativereading of personal self-determination canprovide a firmer basis for ethical guidelinesand policies in this field.

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References found in this work

Just Ignore It? Parents and Genetic Information.Simo Vehmas - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):473-484.
Genetic Privacy: Orthodoxy or Oxymoron?A. Sommerville & V. English - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):144-150.
Value Neutrality in Genetic Counseling: An Unattained Ideal.Christy A. Rentmeester - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):47-51.

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Citations of this work

Research Ethics and Justice: The Case of Finland.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):551-576.
The Relative Importance of Undesirable Truths.Lisa Bortolotti - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):683-690.
Privacy Expectations at Work—What is Reasonable and Why?Elin Palm - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):201-215.
The Relative Importance of Undesirable Truths.Lisa Bortolotti - 2012 - Medicine Healthcare and Philosophy (4):683-690.

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