Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):412-413 (2007)

Abstract
Ramsey et al. attempt to clarify methodological issues for identifying innovative behaviour. Their effort is seriously weakened by an underlying presumption that the behavior of primates is generally learned and that of non-primates is generally This presumption is based on a poor grasp of the non-primate literature and a flawed understanding of how learned behaviour is genetically assimilated
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DOI 10.1017/S0140525X07002439
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The Active Role of Behaviour in Evolution.Patrick Bateson - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):283-298.
Emergence of Mind and the Baldwin Effect.Bruce H. Weber - 2003 - In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press. pp. 309--326.

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