Democracy in decent nonliberal nations: A defense

Philosophical Forum 40 (3):309-337 (2009)

Abstract

Western democracy theorists accept the "liberal democracy thesis" and claim that the only morally justifiable conception of democracy is liberal democracy regulated by substantive liberal values. According to this thesis, democracy not regulated by liberal values in nonliberal nations, if at all feasible, necessarily leads to the oppression of minorities and is therefore morally unjustifiable. This article aims to refute the liberal democracy thesis by arguing that democracy in "decent" nonliberal nations is not only feasible but also morally justifiable.

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References found in this work

Free Agency.Gary Watson - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (April):205-20.
Free Agency.Gary Watson - 2003 - In Free Will. Oxford University Press.
The Faintest Passion.Harry Frankfurt - 1992 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 66 (3):5-16.
Immigration and the Significance of Culture.Samuel Scheffler - 2007 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (2):93–125.

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Citations of this work

Confucian Democracy and Equality.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):261-282.
Agency Without Autonomy: Valuational Agency.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2010 - Journal of Global Ethics 6 (3):239-254.

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