A Daoist theory of Chinese thought: a philosophical interpretation

New York: Oxford University Press (1992)
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Abstract

This ambitious book presents a new interpretation of Chinese thought guided both by a philosopher's sense of mystery and by a sound philosophical theory of meaning. That dual goal, Hansen argues, requires a unified translation theory. It must provide a single coherent account of the issues that motivated both the recently untangled Chinese linguistic analysis and the familiar moral-political disputes. Hansen's unified approach uncovers a philosophical sophistication in Daoism that traditional accounts have overlooked. The Daoist theory treats the imperious intuitionism that alienates critical thinkers as a feature of Confucianism alone. Freed from the view that Confucianism is the core of Chinese thought and from myopic Confucian interpretations, Chinese thinkers emerge as unmistakably philosophical.

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Chad Hansen
University of Hong Kong

Citations of this work

Wandering the Way: A Eudaimonistic Approach to the Zhuāngzǐ.Chris Fraser - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):541-565.
On the Universality of Argumentative Reasoning.Hugo Mercier - 2011 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (1-2):85-113.
Beyond the troubled water of Shifei: from disputation to walking-two-roads in the Zhuangzi.Lin Ma - 2019 - Albany: State University of New York Press. Edited by J. van Brakel.
Chinese ethics.David Wong - 2012 - In Ed Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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