Exploring the Security of Information Sharing on Social Networking Sites: The Role of Perceived Control of Information

Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):111-123 (2016)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Social networking sites have challenged ethical issues about users’ information security and privacy. SNS users are concerned about their privacy and need to control the information they share and its use. This paper examines the security of SNS by taking a look at the influence of users’ perceived control of information over their information-sharing behaviors. Employing an empirical study, this paper demonstrates the importance of perceived control in SNS users’ information-sharing behaviors. Specifically, perceived control has been found to be negatively related to perceived privacy risk and attitude toward information sharing, which in turn has an impact on their information-sharing behaviors. In addition, gender has been shown to be an important factor that moderates the influences of both perceived control and perceived privacy risk on SNS users’ attitudes toward information sharing. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 77,697

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Reve{a,i}ling the Risks.Wolter Pieters - 2010 - Techne 14 (3):194-206.
Contextual gaps: privacy issues on Facebook.Gordon Hull, Heather Richter Lipford & Celine Latulipe - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):289-302.
The Practice of Networking: An Ethical Approach.Domènec Melé - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):487 - 503.
You’ve Been Tagged!William P. Smith - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:35-42.
studiVZ: social networking in the surveillance society. [REVIEW]Christian Fuchs - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):171-185.

Analytics

Added to PP
2014-09-10

Downloads
34 (#350,352)

6 months
1 (#481,005)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

X. Lin
Drexel University