The other question: can and should robots have rights?

Ethics and Information Technology 20 (2):87-99 (2018)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

This essay addresses the other side of the robot ethics debate, taking up and investigating the question “Can and should robots have rights?” The examination of this subject proceeds by way of three steps or movements. We begin by looking at and analyzing the form of the question itself. There is an important philosophical difference between the two modal verbs that organize the inquiry—can and should. This difference has considerable history behind it that influences what is asked about and how. Second, capitalizing on this verbal distinction, it is possible to identify four modalities concerning social robots and the question of rights. The second section will identify and critically assess these four modalities as they have been deployed and developed in the current literature. Finally, we will conclude by proposing another alternative, a way of thinking otherwise that effectively challenges the existing rules of the game and provides for other ways of theorizing moral standing that can scale to the unique challenges and opportunities that are confronted in the face of social robots.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,150

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Sexual Rights, Disability and Sex Robots.Ezio Di Nucci - 2017 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Sex Robots. MIT Press.
Military Robots and the Question of Responsibility.Lamber Royakkers & Peter Olsthoorn - 2014 - International Journal of Technoethics 5 (1):01-14.
Can we trust robots?Mark Coeckelbergh - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):53-60.
On the Very Idea of Sex with Robots.Mark Migotti & Nicole Wyatt - 2018 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social Implications and Ethical. MIT. pp. 15-27.
Just war and robots’ killings.Thomas W. Simpson & Vincent C. Müller - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (263):302-22.
On the epigenesis of meaning in robots and organisms.Tom Ziemke - 2002 - Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):101-110.
Why Do We Have the Rights We Do?Hugo Adam Bedau - 1984 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (2):56.
On the moral responsibility of military robots.Thomas Hellström - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):99-107.

Analytics

Added to PP
2017-10-25

Downloads
237 (#85,783)

6 months
46 (#92,311)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

David Gunkel
Northern Illinois University

References found in this work

Brainstorms: Philosophical Essays on Mind and Psychology.Daniel C. Dennett (ed.) - 1978 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Bradford Books.
Superintelligence: paths, dangers, strategies.Nick Bostrom (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation.Jeremy Bentham - 1780 - New York: Dover Publications. Edited by J. H. Burns & H. L. A. Hart.
Totality and infinity: an essay on exteriority.Emmanuel Levinas - 1961 - Hingham, MA: distribution for the U.S. and Canada, Kluwer Boston.

View all 56 references / Add more references