Cognitive control in altruism and self-control: A social cognitive neuroscience perspective

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):260-260 (2002)
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Abstract

The primrose path and prisoner's dilemma paradigms may require cognitive (executive) control: The active maintenance of context representations in lateral prefrontal cortex to provide top-down support for specific behaviors in the face of short delays or stronger response tendencies. This perspective suggests further tests of whether altruism is a type of self-control, including brain imaging, induced affect, and dual-task studies.

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