Philosophy East and West 54 (2):113-142 (2004)

Authors
Jane Geaney
University of Richmond
Abstract
: In response to allegations that China is a "shame culture," scholars of Confucian ethics have made use of new studies in psychology, anthropology, and philosophy that present shame in a more favorable light. These studies contend that shame involves internalization of social moral codes. By adapting these new internal models of shame, Confucian ethicists have attempted to rehabilitate the emphasis on shame in early Confucianism, but in doing so they have inadvertently highlighted the striking absence in early Confucian texts of such prominent shame metaphors as being seen, particularly with genitals exposed. This essay analyzes these visual metaphors for shame, in contrast to contact metaphors, and considers the implications for Confucian ethics that they might be two different types of shame.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1353/pew.2004.0004
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 68,908
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Shame, Vulnerability, and Change.Jing Iris Hu - 2022 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 8 (2):373-390.
Filiality, Compassion, and Confucian Democracy.Sungmoon Kim - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):279 – 298.
A Confucian Theory of Shame.Nathaniel F. Barrett - 2015 - Sophia 54 (2):143-163.

View all 10 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Corporeality of Shame: Px and Hx at the Bedside.Fritz Hartmann - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):63-74.
Shame and the Future of Feminism.Jill Locke - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):146-162.
Is Shame a Social Emotion?Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna - 2011 - In Anita Konzelmann Ziv, Keith Lehrer & Hans Bernard Schmid (eds.), Self-Evaluation: Affective and Social Grounds of Intentionality. Springer. pp. 193-212.
Differentiating Shame From Guilt.Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1063-1400..

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
411 ( #23,364 of 2,497,752 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
3 ( #212,462 of 2,497,752 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes