The public forum and Christian ethics

New York: Cambridge University Press (2001)
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Abstract

This book addresses the question of the communication of Christian ethics in the public forum of liberal, pluralist societies. Drawing on debates in philosophy, theology and sociological theory, it relates the problem of communication to fundamental questions about the nature of liberal societies and the identity of Christian faith and the Christian community. With particular emphasis on Kantian and neo-Kantian ethics, it explores the link between autonomy and community in liberal societies. The theology of communio, expressed in revealed Christian traditions, can reconcile autonomy and community. Any Christian attempt to communicate this vision must also reflect on Christianity's own identity, especially the ways in which its own self-consciousness grows in critical interaction with secularity. In this light, Christian ethical communication is both a witness to a distinctive identity, founded in the revelation of the triune God, and a vision of universal human solidarity which can reconcile autonomy and community.

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Citations of this work

Hauerwas among the virtues.Jennifer A. Herdt - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):202-227.
Sharing Peace: Discipline and Trust.Paul J. Wadell - 2004 - In Stanley Hauerwas & Samuel Wells (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Christian Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 289.
Confessing the Faith: Reasoning in Tradition.Nicholas Adams - 2004 - In Stanley Hauerwas & Samuel Wells (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Christian Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 209.

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